Women’s History Month

Toast the women of Hobart Festival of Women Writers.

Dawn in the Western Catskills

VIEW OUR VIRTUAL READINGS FROM FESTIVAL 2020:

https://bit.ly/3rA4xLT A STUNNING LINEUP OF 42 PARTICIPATING WRITERS

and check out our Spotlights of previous Participating Writers http://www.hobartfestivalofwomenwriters.blog

New Books from Festival Participating Writers:

We Are Not Wearing Helmets

by Cheryl Boyce-Taylor

Here are flowers and their attendant fragrances: hope, heartbreak, pleasure, longing. Cheryl Boyce-Taylor offers a living archive that includes the dead, a loving archive that retains love’s complexity, a catalog of moments that cannot end. Enjoy this book and keep it in a place where you can see it. Maybe somewhere you would keep a carefully arranged bloom of flowers. It will continue to remind you of what life is: beautiful, specific, and too often cut short.” —Alexis Pauline Gumbs

Blue by Nana Ekua Brew-Hammond

Blue by Nana Ekua Brew-Hammond, illustrated by Daniel Minter

https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/606200/blue-by-nana-ekua-brew-hammond-illustrated-by-daniel-minter/

Discover a world of creativity and tradition in this fascinating picture book that explores the history and cultural significance of the color blue. From a critically acclaimed author and an award-winning illustrator comes a vivid, gorgeous book for readers of all ages.

OUTWRITE: The Speeches that Shaped LGBTQ Literary Culture edited by Julie Enszer With work by Festival co-founder, Cheryl Clarke

http://www.rutgersuniversitypress.org/outwrite/9781978828032?fbclid=IwAR14hD7bhLfS0YOaFGb5WKPUmgl6ZLWD4cJbbyvZ269HNoCMtc5IYFGKq8A

This collection gives readers a taste of this fabulous moment in LGBTQ literary history with twenty-seven of the most memorable speeches from the OutWrite conference, including both keynote addresses and panel presentations. 

a collection by Cynthia Dewi Oka

In her third collection, Indonesian American poet Cynthia Dewi Oka dives into the implications of being parents, children, workers, and unwanted human beings under the savage reign of global capitalism and resurgent nativism. With a voice bound and wrestled apart by multiple histories, Fire Is Not a Country claims the spaces between here and there, then and now, us and not us.

https://www.cynthiadewioka.com

new non-fiction from Sophfronia Scott

As a Black woman who is not Catholic, Scott both learns from and pushes back against Merton, holding spirited, and intimate conversations on race, ambition, faith, activism, nature, prayer, friendship, and love. She asks: What is the connection between contemplation and action? Is there ever such a thing as a wrong answer to a spiritual question? How do we care about the brutality in the world while not becoming overwhelmed by it?https://sophfronia.com

In I’m Speaking Now: Black Women Share their Truths in 101 Stories of Love, Courage and Hope, edited by Breena Clarke and Amy Newmark https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Chicken-Soup-for-the-Soul-Im-Speaking-Now/Amy-Newmark/9781611590838 Black women speak frankly and truthfully about their lives in 101 straightforward narratives and poems.

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NOW, an online journal, has brought together poetry, fiction, and essays from the Participating Writers from HFWW’s nine-year programming history. Published in 2020 and 2021 this journal reflects the range and breadth of creative work from HFWW’s Participating Writers.
https://www.hfwwnow.com

Includes the work of: Keisha-Gaye Anderson, Maria Mazziotti Gillan, Esther Cohen, Lisa Wujnovich, Breena Clarke, Arisa White, Alexis DeVeaux., Cheryl Boyce-Taylor, Ellen Meeropol, Nancy Bereano. Julie Enszer, Aine Greaney, Linda Lowen, Elizabeth Searle, Cheryl Clarke, Diane Gilliam, Stephanie Nikolopoulos, Dahlma Llanos-Figueroa, Nana Ekua Bew-Hammond, Denise B. Dailey, Annie Finch, Bertha Rogers, E.J. Antonio, Elisabeth Nonas, Elena Schwolsky, Kathy Engel.

We were shocked and saddened at the loss of our sister, Kamilah Aisha Moon this past year. This tribute:

Kamilah was a Participating Writer at the 2016 Festival. Needless to say, she stunned us with her poetry, its elegance and brilliance. She happily told us then she would be starting that fall as an Assistant Professor of English at Agnes Scott College in Decatur, Ga. Just as happily, we congratulated her, wished her well, and made her promise to return to Hobart from Decatur, though not so near as New York City. Kamilah was such a lovely presence, an empathic poet, full of light and grace. She will be missed in the world of poetry, in the world of women, in the world.

Ending this tribute with a passage from her praise poem, “Catskills Retreat,”* seems fitting:

                           I take cool, high altitude breaths

                           & recall other heights, gaze

                           at humbling shoulders of earth

                           brushing up against brazen blue—

                           channel a lily pad lightness upon

                           woman-made depths to face matters

                           long past skimming . . .

                           . . .  bless my fellow travelers & the blades

                           of grass forgiving our steps, springing

                           back up. Bless the beaver beginning

                           again and again, the monarch’s 

                           meandering flight. Bless these mosquitoes

                           & their insatiable thirst, the bluejays

                           at dawn trilling you are not through

*Starshine and Clay, Four Way Books/Tribeca, ‘17.

Join us on September 9, 10 & 11th for Festival 2022 In-Person in Hobart

for information, go to www.hobartfestivalofwomenwriters.com

Follow us on Facebook at @HobartFestivalofWomenWriters

Follow our blog at http://www.hobartfestivalofwomenwriters.blog

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