Spotlight: Words & Images

It was a childhood of inspiration and creativity. Some summers were spent in the mountains of upstate New York, helping my grandmother at the tourist home she owned on Main Street waiting tables and hanging crisp white sheets on the line, singing and entertaining guests after dinner. At college, I had the opportunity to spend my junior year in Siena, Italy. My early experiences gave me exposure to a world of creative minds and alternative life styles. 

Spotlight: The New Writers

Get to know the New Writers joining Hobart Festival of Women Writers 2019    Stephanie Nikolopoulos, Hobart Festival of Women Writers blogger and Participating Writer, speaks to the women joining The Festival for the first time. Link to her Q&A.  SPOTLIGHT on Marilyn McCabe – http://bit.ly/2VDXP5S SPOTLIGHT on Ellen Meeropol- http://bit.ly/2wz16tj.                 SPOTLIGHT…

Spotlight: Margot Farrington

I never consider how I’ll read a poem while writing it. When reading it to listeners, the greatest gift I can give them is spontaneity. Something in the read or recited poem should always remain fluid, open to surprise.

Spotlight: Linda Lowen

The integrity of your voice is important. So is delivering a well-crafted piece of prose. Clarity and readability are essential if you want to be understood — and read.

Spotlight: Mecca Jamilah Sullivan

What are “these times” for us as writers, readers and community members? Are they different given our particular identifications/localities/literary genres? What is “the news”/what are the issues occupying our writings today? How are we expressing a practice of language in our writing?

Spotlight: Ifeona Fulani

Character is a product of dynamic interaction with place, whether that place is a modern city, a medieval castle or a space station on an alien planet. No matter where, how can setting support a character’s desires and actions? How will it frustrate them and generate conflict?

Spotlight: Yolanda Wisher

My goal isn’t usually project completion or “making” time for everything. It’s simply about acknowledging and honoring my impulses to create, however or whenever they emerge. I like to let a project take shape on its own, let it evolve around my life and living, rather than force it to adhere to a certain timeline.

Spotlight: Marya Hornbacher

Voice, to the extent that it is a thing in itself, is not a static or stable thing. A writer’s voice changes with time, and all the time. With every piece, every character, every subject, perhaps with every line, a writer’s voice has to change. I would worry that writers whose voices do not change over time would get tired of hearing themselves talk. This is not to say that that voice is fully and wholly new each time a writer writes; but each time a writer changes, so too does her voice.

Spotlight: Diane Gilliam

When you don’t know the story of your people, it’s like somebody reached in and snatched out a big chunk of your backbone. You need your backbone. You need your whole story, as much of it as you can get. And it needs to be the story as your people lived it, not the official version.  That is part of poetry’s work in the world—to help keep alive stories that we need to live by.

Spotlight: Nancy Agabian

So performance got intertwined with my self-definition and with finding my voice. Since then, performance has helped me to understand voice — especially spoken language vs. written language. It has allowed me to feel the pressure of a listening audience, which helps to edit and craft a text.

Spotlight: Ellen Meeropol

The best encouragement I can give to other literary late bloomers is that age brings a depth and width of life experience and wisdom to our work, as well as understanding about how complex our world can be. This ability to reflect on what we’ve seen and thought, to dig deeply into big questions, is a potentially amazing resource usually not available to young writers.

Spotlight: Marilyn McCabe

Even if I’m not writing specifically about the Adirondacks, the nature reflected in so much of my poetry is invariably this kind of nature: dark pines, rushing streams, a bumpy horizon designed by departing glaciers and old tectonic shrugs.